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CORKEY USE IN THE MILITARY

Unaccompanied Personnel Housing at Yokota Air Base, Japan, recently acquired an innovative master-keying system that simplifies key accountability and operation in the dormitories. This system, called CorKey, was invented in 1974 by Bruce Sedley, president of Burlingame, Calif.- based CorKey Control Systems, Inc.
In 1998, Sedley gave a presentation at the PHMA trade show in Tulsa, Okla. The presentation demonstrated that very minimal modification would enable Yokota to install this system in its existing door locks. When contacted, CorKey advised Yokota it had already adapted its system to all of the types of Japanese locks on the base. This was due to contracts to CorKey to install more than 5,000 door locks in more than 40 elementary and high schools on bases in Mainland Japan, Okinawa, Guam, and Korea. Three of the major schools are located at Yokota Air Base.


No computers are required to program or change the serial code that previously was assigned to a card. All it takes is a handy "gun" and a Code Fixture, as Zenaida Travers demonstrates.

When the Japanese government built Yokota's dormitories, they installed a lock whose key cylinder could not be changed. Not only did the system have limited master-keying capability, but the base had no way of changing it.

On the other hand, the keys could be duplicated in any Japanese hardware store in Tokyo and to make things worse, the base's key records were not current. Lost and unaccounted for keys impacted the security of government assets as well as the safety of residents. Unauthorized individuals were caught in day rooms, using dormitory laundry facilities, and entertaining in kitchens. Thefts of military uniforms, expensive lingerie, Nike athletic shoes, and American denim blue jeans were on the rise.

Responses to after-duty lockouts were done in-house by a military locksmith on standby. Yokota's dormitory manager also was on standby. An average of eight to 10 lockouts were called in each night. Due to a rise in calls, Yokota's locksmith was unable to respond to true emergencies and the standby dormitory manager responded at all hours to ghost calls from residents who didn't bother waiting or finally found their keys. He was normally seen carrying a key ring with three or four master keys, each of which he tried before finding the right key for the door. Yokota's key boxes were overflowing with "orphan" keys staff dared not throw away, just in case.

In addition, the condition of Yokota's doors showed the need for immediate attention. Emergency doors revealed broken hinges, bent strike plates, and damaged exit devices. Doors were being propped open by residents with rocks, coat hangers, ropes, and anything that provided easy access to the buildings.

Then Yokota discovered CorKey. It was a completely mechanical system without wires, batteries, or computers to log on or reprogram. Instead of the normal metal key, this system used a flat stainless steel card, magnetically coded and weather resistant. This meant no more bulky key storage boxes, the orphan keys could be eliminated, and everyone could enjoy an uninterrupted night's sleep.

The CorKey lock is unconventional. Unlike other card-operated locks, it is not electronic. It does not require electricity, wiring, batteries, or a central computer system. In Yokota's opinion, it is the most dependable and efficient system to install, maintain, and recode.

In the short time Yokota's system has been in place, numerous benefits have been realized. First and foremost, exit doors have been secured. Also, Yokota saw a dramatic reduction in unnecessary calls and the lockout response process became more customer-service oriented. Calls are now centrally received by the civil engineer customer service desk after duty hours, and are responded to by a private locksmith. Unnecessary calls were reduced by 95 percent due to a $38 service charge for any after-duty-hours lockout calls. Fire department engineers welcome the exterior lock boxes that are readily accessible to them during fire drills and real-life emergencies.
To date, the base expects at least a 60 percent reduction in key and door system maintenance including card replacements each year. The CorKey system not only enhanced the security of Yokota's residents but also gave the base the right tool to protect government assets. The card itself has no visible room identification number.


Before: the old door knob using a regular key.


After: the new "keyless" system is in place. A metal card has replaced the traditional key.

What about lost cards? Each resident is assigned individual serial codes that are automatically changed once a card is lost. CorKey cards cannot be readily copied anywhere in Tokyo and a private locksmith cannot duplicate a card unless the dormitory manager provides written authorization.

Lastly, the new system gave dormitory management complete control of the cards and the knowledge that it is possible to have one card that opens every door at a reasonable cost.

Zenaida Travers was Chief, Housing Assistance, of the 374th Civil Engineer Squadron at Yokota AB, Japan. As of year 2002, she can be reached at the housing department of McGuire Air Base in New Jersey, e-mail: TraversZ@mcguire.af.mil

DEFENSE COMMUNITIES #19
NOVEMBER/DECEMBER 1999

YOKOTA BASE HOUSING NETS 60% SAVING WITH NEW MECHANICAL CARD LOCK SYSTEM

WHEN MRS. ZENAIDA TRAVERS TOOK OVER MANAGEMENT OF THE UNACCOMPANIED HOUSING AT YOKOTA AIR BASE, ONE OF THE LARGEST BASES IN JAPAN, THERE WAS LITTLE PHYSICAL SECURITY AND EVEN LESS CONTROL OF DOORS KEYS. TENANTS WERE OBTAINING UNAUTHORIZED KEYS, MASTERKEYS WERE UNACCOUNTED FOR AND THERE WAS NO SIMPLE WAY TO CHANGE LOCK CODES OR SECURE THE BUILDINGS.

That has all changed since Mrs Travers installed the Corkey Control System of mechanical card-operated door locks that adapted to her existing locksets. 12 buildings are individually mastered and a single Great Grand Master is available to Force Protection, the Fire Departments and Housing Administration.

 

Zenaida Travers, Yokota Base Chief, Housing Assistance codes a Grand Master CorKey Card for all her buildings. (As of year 2002, she can be reached at the housing department of McGuire Air Base in New Jersey).
e-mail: TraversZ@mcguire.af.mil

Each Tenant carries a stainless steel "corkey". Its magnetic code, which can be applied on Base, opens: exterior doors to Housing buildings; Laundry and Day Rooms plus each tenant apartment. Separate cards access storage and utility rooms and secure the Computer Rooms now installed in most of the dormitories.

If a lost Corkey is reported a new one can be coded instantly with a different code and the door lock changed from outside the door to match the new code. No masterkeys need to be changed when new tenant cards are issued. If a building master is lost or stolen all locks can be changed from outside the door as fast as you can walk from door to door. Not a single tenant key has to be modified even when the Great Grand Master is replaced.

Mrs Travers expects a yearly saving of 60% of previous year costs in the servicing of the keying system, which is supported by Base maintenance personnel.

A reward was granted for the anticipated Base saving.

CONTACT "CORKEY" TO REGAIN CONTROL OF YOUR SECURITY SYSTEM. Isn't it about time?


The Corkey lock is unique.
Unlike other card-operated locks it is not electronic. No electricity, no wiring, no batteries, no central computer system. It is, therefore, ultimately dependable.
But the star feature is its ease of installation. The Corkey lock is the only one which will retrofit in existing doors and replaces old key-in-knob and other locks. Installation can be completed throughout a large building in just a few days. Subsequent re-coding is achieved from outside the lock in just a few seconds.
The Corkey system not only requires the least time to install, maintain and re-code, it is also the least expensive.
Your conventional security-risk lock dates back over 100 years. That was then.
Corkey is now.


This is the Corkey.
A magnetic card encased in stainless steel or plastic that makes a bunch of ordinary cumbersome keys virtually obsolete. Because this one Corkey can be easily coded for all the doors you'll ever need to open. And it opens them in just the same way - not electronically, but mechanically.
When a Corkey is lost, stolen, or taken away by hotel guests, apartment tenants or office workers and security is jeopardized, other Corkeys and the locks are simply recOded in a matter of seconds. The missing keys pose no threat to security.
There's only one Corkey. It's all you'll ever need and it will last a life-time. It's the lowest cost key control system in the world today.






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